Subcomandante Marcos- the postmodern Che Guevara

Leave a comment

October 31, 2012 by kguzman707

Subcomandante Marcos hides his identity behind a black mask. He is the leader of Mexico’s Zapatista rebels and his main fight is to defend the rights of the indigenous people of Mexico. He also continues Emiliano Zapata’s agrarian reform fight in Mexico. To those who support him, Marcos is known as a leader who stands up for the poor. On the other hand, there are some elites and business people who characterize him as an irresponsible dreamer and a blackmailer. In the capital of Mexico, Marcos and his rebels are welcomed and treated like celebrities instead of guerillas.  Apart from protesting the federal government’s mistreatment of indigenous people, Subcomandante Marcos is a writer and a political poet. Marcos and his rebels insist on amending Mexico’s constitution so that it can recognize the political and human rights of Mexico’s indigenous people. Marcos refuses to take of his mask until the conflict is resolved. He says that the mask is a “mirror’; it represents an Asian, a Chicano, an anarchist in Spain, a Palestinian in Israel, a Jew, an indian in San Cristobal, anyone and anywhere. It is believed that Marcos is actually Rafael Sebastian Guillen, perhaps fifty-something years old now, and from the northern state of Tamaulipas. It is believed that he used to teach philosophy at Mexico City’s National Autonomous University. Marcos is married as well and wanting a child.  Marcos and his rebels tried to carry out a protest to dramatize the poor conditions in Chiapas, but the attempt failed and Chiapas continues to be impoverished and in violence. Marcos further accused Felipe Calderon, President of Mexico, of being allied with some gangs in order to wipe out others. He considers the Mexican presidential election process as a useless procedure to endure. All in all, Subcomandante Marcos and his rebels’ continue to fight for the oppressed and are looked upon positively by those he fights for.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: